Hawaii, backpack and small budget / Episode 2: Kaua’i — A view from above. Koke’e State Park.

The Trail of the Queen, spiritual and swampy hike, high in “one of the wettest spots on Earth.”
Koke’e State Park.

Sometimes you can get a bit wet, hiking in the rain. Then you can get wet, hiking in the rain, in one of the wettest places on the planet. How does it feel? Like getting into a lukewarm bathtub, fully dressed, shoes, and backpack on. Literally. Even with waterproof layers, you drip down inside/under. Drenched. Pants like you’ve swam in the Ocean wearing them.
But hey, when you are three hours from the trailhead, AND in the open nature (with nowhere to hide), AND crossing a swamp on top of a tropical island … your options are pretty slim. Basically, a “— you’ve made it so far, just keep going …”

 

Day 4
Waimea Canyon and Koke’e State Park

Day 4 on Kaua’i.
Another good night at Yvonne’s. Breakfast with toasts, coffee, and fresh mangos and fruits from the garden.

Everything is so green and offering so much. I start to truly understand the island’s given name, Garden Island, and the different stories we heard of people “trapped” here. I would easily—and gladly—fall into a such a destiny, forced to spend the rest of my life here.

We pack the car, and say bye our host, as adventures lay ahead and we have no plan to come back. Driving to the West. Sun and clear skies, then heavy rain and nightfall for five minutes, then clear skies again. So tropical.

We cross a lot of smaller cities and villages, and the more we drive, the more everything seems to get a bit more rustic, simpler.

Highway 50, to Waimea Canyon and Koke'e State Park

Green and grey …

Highway 50, to Waimea Canyon and Koke'e State Park
Highway 50, to Waimea Canyon and Koke'e State Park

… and two minutes later, blue and blue!

And Eleele School, not too bad of an environment to study!

Highway 50, to Waimea Canyon and Koke'e State Park

“Barking Sands”. Love the image of it. Warf. (It actually comes from the kind of sand the beach is made from. This sand makes a barking noise when you step or rub it. Check the first seconds of this video if you want: https://youtu.be/mt2xnggkQNs :) )

“Waimea Canyon” up on the right.

We stop just before the fork where the road starts climbing up to Koke’e. Lunch time! Looking at the Ocean, and now being good judge of where the water is safe, I declare that we should not even touch the sand. We sit on the rocks near the sand and start eating, until, minutes later, a single giant wave that appeared from nowhere washes us. Even though we were like 60 feet away from where the waves died on the beach, this single one came out of nowhere with an unpredictable strength, and may have swallowed us if we had been sitting on the sand.

We retreat closer to the road.

When everything is kind of dry, we get back in the car and start driving up. Again, from clear skies to heavy strong showers in three minutes. We stop on the shoulder, forced by the weather. No way to keep going, even at very slow speed. Zero visibility.

Road to Waimea Canyon and Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii

We start driving up. Doesn’t look so great up there …

Road to Waimea Canyon and Koke'e State Park, rain, Kaua'i, Hawaii

… and here we need to stop.

A wall of water in front of us, and so dense that, like in the cartoons, you keep looking, hoping to see a fish swimming in there.

Minutes later, we start climbing again to the Waimea Canyon Viewpoint, at 3,400 ft. alt. The rain stopped, we feel lucky to be able to step out and walk a bit. The view there is fantastically … clogged :D . But I still love seeing this couple on the back with a selfie-stick. No matter what!

Puu Hinahina Lookout, Waimea Canyon and Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii
Woman in front of Waimea Canyon, Kaua'i, Hawaii

We keep driving up to the entrance of the park, and head to the Ranger’s Office. Maps, trails, weather forecast … we look at it all, especially that we discover that there is no cellular reception up here. Better know everything before going forward!

Lots of easy trails, too easy for us ( ^^ ), some others might be inaccessible (“— After all that rain and wind, if you go there, you need to have a chainsaw with you. Otherwise you might get stuck. — Uh, OK!”). We agree on the Alaka’i Swamp Trail. After the rain, going to a swamp seems like a good idea, right? :)

One last trail on the board puts my mind to boiling point: one that goes down to Kalalau Valley, walking down a ridge (you will see what the Valley looks like a bit later). Too dangerous, it has been closed. And put off the most recent maps. But the description is still there on the black board, and some say it is still practical and used by locals.

We drive a bit more up to the campsite and pick our spot. #4. Because we spotted a hen and her four little ones walking by at the same moment. And it was cute. We make thoughtful decisions.

We bring the tent out and I start unpacking it. I have pitched many tents in my years, enough to feel confident and not to feel the need to check the manual before leaving the house. I start setting up: ground cover, inside room, weatherproof cover, and it’s time to anchor the pegs. Then, time to slide the poles in … but after trying all the configurations that crossed my mind (in ×, parallel, front-back, side-side …), I resign myself thinking that there might be a part missing. Or there are the poles from another tent.

So with a half-down tent up, we get back on the car to explore further up.
It’s foggy, and our first stop at the Kalalau Viewpoint, 4,000 ft. high, doesn’t give us much. We can feel the vastness and emptiness in front of us … but that’s pretty much it.

Girl stretching, Kaua'i, Hawaii

:)

We drive to the dead-end of the road and second viewpoint, Pu’u o Kila, and it’s a different story there.

Road to Pu'u o Kila Lookout, Kaua'i, Hawaii
Road to Pu'u o Kila Lookout, Kaua'i, Hawaii

Even just driving here is amazing …

A trail leaves from the viewpoint, going North, bringing us in front of a wooden sign:

“Wai’Ale’Ale, one of the wettest spots on Earth. Elev 5,140 ft”

We pass it and hike downhill, following the ridge along the cliff, to find, about twenty minutes later, the perfect spot to watch the Sun go down.

Walking down in the mist, Kalalau Valley, Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii

Going down, through the mist.

Clouds, Trees, Kalalau Valley, Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii
Green plants, Mist, Kalalau Valley, Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii
Walking down in the mist, Kalalau Valley, Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii
Drops of rain on a green plant, Kalalau Valley, Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii

“Wettest point on Earth”? Plants seem to agree.

Mist in the trees, Kalalau Valley, Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii
Kalalau Valley seen from above, Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii

Speechless. Except for one magical sentence: “— we’ll be down there (pointing at the trail that we imagine running along the shore, 5,000 ft below) in two days.”

Woman in front of Kalalau Valley seen from above, Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii
Feet in front of Kalalau Valley seen from above, Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii

Feet just in front of 4,000 ft vertical fall.

(oh, and remember the dangerous trail? Look again at the previous pictures and try to imagine a trail that goes down from up to the bottom of the Valley. It all looks so sharp and vertical … From up here, the Valley is around 4,000 ft below).

The Sun finishes its course under the horizon, setting the clouds ablaze for an instant, before putting this part of the World at a peaceful rest. Everything gets quiet, still.

Woman in front of forest, Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii
Ridge and Pacific Ocean behind it, at Sunset, Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii
Sunset, Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii
Kalalau Valley from above, Sunset, Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii
Kalalau Valley from above, Sunset, Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii

Only 8 minutes went by between the previous, this one, and the next picture.

Kalalau Valley from above, Sunset, Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii
Ridge and Pacific Ocean behind it, Sunset, Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii

We walk back to the trailhead, and say “goodbye” for tonight, and “thank you.” It was incredible.

Woman standing in front of Kalalau Valley Viewpoint, Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii

Feeling grateful!

Wai'Ale'Ale sign, One of the wettest points on Earth, Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii

Back to the camp with the fall of the night, freezing river-water shower under the beams of our headlamps, dinner under the stars, night under a collapsing tent.

I know romance.

Dinner in the dark, Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii

Day 5
“The trail of the Queen”: Alaka’i Swamp Trail

I read out loud what the Lonely Planet says about the trail.

“[…] This is a spiritual place: Queen Emma was said to have been so moved by tales from the Alaka’i that she ventured there, only to chant in reverence during the sojourn.”

Promising!

The coffee is brewing at the bottom of the cups, the oatmeal is getting ready. A good breakfast at dawn, before heading again to Pu’u o Kila, the dead-end of the road, and trailhead.

Breakfast on the campsite, Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii
Breakfast on the campsite, Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii
 

Because of the bad weather of the last days (remember, there was a hurricane coming our way. Wait, what?! You haven’t read Episode 1?), there is nobody around. Just one car up here, but from a family who seems to be coming only for a quick view. We start hiking downhill again, following the ridge, along the cliff, like yesterday. Our breaths, footsteps, the wind in the trees, and several birds. Nothing else comes to our ears. Peaceful. The terrain changes often in the first part of the trail. Sometimes climbing up an almost vertical wall, or going down like lizards, or jumping around giant mud puddles. We walk at a good pace, carefully trying to avoid getting soaked and dirty. It is just the beginning, let’s wait to get to the swamp for that. :)

Walking in the mist, Kalalau Valley, Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii

Walking down again. The fog is thick this morning. On the left, a ridge with a 4,000 ft fall, on the right, 300 ft “only”.

Under: crossing an eerie forest.

Walking in the mist in a forest, Kalalau Valley, Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii
Big spiderweb, Kalalau Valley, Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii

Don’t walk into that.

Hiking woman, Kalalau Valley, Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii
Hiking woman, Kalalau Valley, Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii

Some of the stuff we came across. Stay dry!

Hiking and climbing in the mud, Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii

After following the cliff, we reach a junction and take a right, going down inland, in a completely different decor. From the mostly bare wood-patched cliff, we dive into a green, moist, giant jungle. You walk here on a grid-metal pathway, a foot above the ground, giving you the feeling of flying through the place. Not steeping onto the ground makes this land feel even more special, sacred. Not disturbing anything.

Hiking and climbing in the mud, Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii

At the junction.

Mushroom in tree trunk, Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii

Humid?

Green plants, Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii
Woman hiking in the mist, Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii
Woman hiking in the mist, Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii

We have hiked for almost two hours, and haven’t seen a single human since.

Woman walking in the mist, Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii
Woman pulling metal piece form shoe, Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii

“Oh. Something’s poking me!!”.
Walking on the metal grid that makes the pathway can lead to that. An inch-long piece of metal went straight up through the sole of her shoe. Good thing it wasn’t longer, it would have gone into her foot …

We reach another junction. Ahead, back to another trailhead. On the left, the way to the swamp, and the trail plunges down into a valley. Left we go. The lengthy metal pathway turns into short and steep metal steps, forming sinuous stairs disappearing down below. It all feels giant, magical … mystical.

Woman walking in a tropical forest, Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii
Woman walking in a tropical forest, Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii
Woman walking in a tropical forest, Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii
Woman walking down stairs in the mist, Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii

Down … down … down

We finally get to a river. There is some current, but some rocks are big enough for you to walk on them and cross over the water. And … we go back up, climbing the other side of the valley.

Minutes later, almost suddenly, the giant jungle stops, and the climb turns into a perfectly flat terrain, as far as eye can see.

Low level, we can cross on the rocks!

Low level, we can cross on the rocks!

A different yet powerful feeling of spirituality surrounds this place. The jungle was warm, and so full of green and life that it sometimes almost felt oppressing.

Up here, the view is open, the wind brushes you, and except for our breaths, it seems that there is no sound to be heard. All is still. I could drop my backpack, find a good posture on the pathway over the water of the swamp, and rest and meditate. But not this time. The rain joins us, slowly at first, then, the rain we know. Heavy. Showers.

Woman under the rain, Alakai Swamp, Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii

Hello rain!

We take our emergency ponchos out of the bags and put them on. But the rain is so strong that after 10 minutes, I feel as if I had no pants on. My legs are soaked, and the water is directly running down into my shoes. Raining so hard that, also, the water doesn’t really have enough time to run down, and a lot of it infiltrates up under the poncho.

“— Sunshine! Oh pretty Sunshine! Oh little pretty Sunshine!! Where are you?!…”

Tanya improvises a song, trying to call the Spirits of the Swamp for a little lull.

We finally meet two human souls (three hours after we started hiking), up here in the middle of nowhere.

“Me: Hi! Did you make it to the end? Is it still far?
(they look at each other)
Him: It’s maybe half-mile, a little more than that?
Tanya: Cool.
Her: It’s worth it, I promise.
Tanya: Awesome!”

Soaked as we already are, and being in the middle of this nowhere, we decide to keep pushing forward.

Even though the path is flat here, it is not necessarily easier than before. We are in a swamp. Over a swamp, I should say, as we are still crossing by waking on metal-grid platforms laid over the water. But the wooden structures that hold the path collapsed or got damaged by the water in some places, and, as a result, part of the trail is underwater or hanging loose over it, calling for prudence as the panels sometimes go down in the water when you step on them, and other times calling for long deer jumps over the water, where the trail totally vanished.

Crossing Alakai Swamp, Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii

Jump!

Crossing Alakai Swamp, Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii

We finally reach the end of the trail, the lookout. The path goes down a couple of steps below the end of the swamp, and just hangs there, on the edge of the cliff.
And here, the view is amazing…ly white. We find a makeshift shelter under a couple of branches hanging over us, protecting a bit from the pouring rain.

We unpack our lunch-salads, and start eating. A nervous — but good — laugh comes out. This has been quite a journey, and here we are, soaked to the bones, still under the pouring rain, in front of a wall of white clouds. But one says it’s not about the destination. It’s about the journey. And this journey has been amazing. We laugh really hard, happy to be here, just the two of us at the edge of the World.

She starts feeling cold from the rain and the wind. We take the pocket flask out of the backpack, and start drinking down the whiskey we put in there. I smile, remembering telling her, still at home in California, that we should pack one, that it’s not about drinking for drinking, but a flask like that always comes handy to save you. And it did indeed.

Kilohana Lookout, crossing Alakai Swamp, Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii

Kilohana Lookout …

Kilohana Lookout, crossing Alakai Swamp, Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii

Looking great!

Reinvigorated by the break, the lunch, and the drink, we start the way back under the raindrops, after saying goodbye to good Kilohana Lookout.

The journey back sees a bit less rain, but it has poured so much that the dust trail has sometimes turned in a mud river, that the river we crossed seems to be now a raging and torrential stream (thankfully not a “stay away, stay alive” one, but still).

Crossing Alakai Swamp, Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii

Walking back, the rain has stopped a bit.

Woman crossing Alakai Swamp, Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii
Woman crossing Alakai Swamp, Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii

Trying to stay “clean”.

Wrinkly hand by the moisture, Alakai Swamp, Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii

Moist? Feels like I just took a bath.

Woman crossing Alakai Swamp, Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii

A bit of sunshine and warmth!

Woman crossing Alakai Swamp, Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii
Woman crossing Alakai Swamp, Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii

Walking down into the jungle again.

Woman crossing Alakai Swamp, Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii

We walked in here on the way in, now it’s a river and we need to cross on the side.

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Woman crossing Alakai Swamp, Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii

The rocks are now underwater.

Woman crossing Alakai Swamp, Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii

(just for the sake of comparing, this was on the way in)

Dinosaur toy in a tree, Alakai Swamp, Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii

Yes, really feels like a tropical primary forest.

Hiking in Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii

It rained a bit here too, on the first part of the trail, making these parts a bit more slippery and tricky to cross.

Getting back at the car, then at the camping. We decide to cut short our stay here. The night will be spent at Yvonne’s. Not much about camping, because it is amazingly beautiful up here, but because the trail of the trip, THE ONE, is happening tomorrow, and we need to dry, get our gear dry, and get some good rest to be ready for it. And, writing after all of this being over, this was the best decision we could have made. Something huge was coming.

Hiking in Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii

We drive down Koke’e State Park at nightfall, and make a quick stop to see the last lights of the day.

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Hiking in Koke'e State Park, Kaua'i, Hawaii

Tonight is a full moon.

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